• Kari Callaghan Mazzola
    Name: Kari Mazzola
    Phone: (406) 626-2670
     
    I am so very happy to serve as an English teacher at Frenchtown High School. During the 2017–2018 school year I will be teaching two English 1 classes, one Honors English 1 class, one Honors English 2 class, two Creative Writing classes (Semesters 1 and 2), one Public Speaking class (Semester 1), and one Multicultural Literature class (Semester 2). I will also be serving as the speech coach for the FHS Speech/Debate team.
     
    Biography
     

    I was born in Butte, Montana in 1964, and over the years my family moved from Butte to Great Falls to Bozeman to Glendive. I graduated from Glendive’s Dawson County High School in 1982 and went on to earn a bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Montana State University and a master’s degree in English Composition and Rhetoric from Iowa State University. After obtaining my master’s degree, I moved to New Jersey, where, from 1990 to 1994, I was an in-house production editor of college textbooks for the Humanities/Social Sciences division of Prentice Hall. In 1991, I married John Mazzola. When our daughter, Meaghan, was born in 1994, I became a freelance production editor so that I could continue to work for Prentice Hall while staying at home with Meaghan. In 1995, John sold his printing business so that he and I could form our own company, Big Sky Composition, and at that point we moved to my “hometown” of Glendive, Montana. (I consider Glendive to be my hometown because I lived there during my sixth-grade, junior-high, and high-school years.) As owners and operators of Big Sky Composition, a full-service textbook-production business, John and I continued to produce college textbooks for the Humanities/Social Sciences division of Prentice Hall/Pearson Education. Our son, Quintin, was born in 1996, and in 1998 we moved to an area between Missoula and Frenchtown. In 2009, John and I decided to dissolve our Big Sky Composition business and make mid-life career changes. John eventually became the Technology Coordinator for the Frenchtown School District, and I decided to return to being an educator. In addition to spending 19 years in the textbook-production business (which was in itself a part of the education profession), I accumulated various teaching experiences over the years, including the following: Tutoring at the MSU Writing Center while earning my bachelor’s degree, tutoring at the Dawson Community College Adult Literacy Education program between finishing at MSU and starting at ISU, and teaching Freshman Composition courses at ISU while earning my master’s degree. At my mid-life turning point, I realized that two things that had remained true throughout my adult years were my love of academia and my enthusiasm for teaching, so I set out to become a secondary-level English teacher. While attending the College of Education at the University of Montana as a post-baccalaureate student in order to obtain Professional Licensure to teach English at the secondary level, I also served as a substitute teacher in the Arlee, Bonner, and Frenchtown School Districts. After being a student teacher at Arlee High School with Dr. Anna Baldwin and at Arlee Junior High School with Mrs. Callie DiFulgentis (as part of the Professional Licensure program), I served as a long-term substitute English teacher at Frenchtown High School at the end of the 2014–2015 school year. I subsequently served as a full-time FHS English teacher during the 2015–2016 and 2016–2017 school years, and I am now serving my third year (2017–2018) as a full-time FHS English teacher.

     

    Class Descriptions

     

    English 1

    English 1 provides a broad introduction to World Literature, with an emphasis not only on reading and discussion skills but also on writing skills. Students writing skills will be developed based on concepts such as basic grammar, basic paragraph structure, the five-paragraph-essay format, and the 6 + 1 writing traits. During the first semester, students will read, discuss, and write about short stories, novels, and non-fiction texts. During the second semester, students will read, discuss, and write about poetry, drama, and non-fiction texts.

     

    Honors English 1

    Honors English 1 provides a broad introduction to World Literature, with an emphasis not only on reading and discussion skills but also on writing skills. Students’ writing skills will be developed based on concepts such as basic grammar, basic paragraph structure, the five-paragraph-essay format, and the 6 + 1 writing traits. During the first semester, students will read, discuss, and write about short stories, novels, and non-fiction texts. During the second semester, students will read, discuss, and write about poetry, drama, and non-fiction texts.

     

    Honors English 2

    Honors English 2 continues the study of World Literature, with an emphasis not only on reading and discussion skills but also on writing skills. Students’ writing skills will continue to be developed based on concepts such as basic grammar, basic paragraph structure, the five-paragraph-essay format, and the 6 + 1 writing traits; furthermore, students’ writing skills will be enhanced by the addition of expository, analytic, and creative-writing assignments. During the first semester, students will read, discuss, and write about short stories, novels, and non-fiction texts. During the second semester, students will read, discuss, and write about novels, short stories, poetry, drama, and non-fiction texts.

     

    Creative Writing

    Creative Writing is the study of various forms of short stories and poetry. Throughout this one-semester course, students will learn these forms of short stories and poetry through intensive and extensive readings and through writing exercises in which they emulate the writing techniques of published writers and discover their own creative voices. Workshop methods will be used for reading and discussing students’ short stories and poems.

     

    Public Speaking

    Public Speaking covers the basic skills and techniques involved in oral communication and presentation, preparing students for effective delivery of speeches for a variety of purposes and audiences. Throughout this one-semester course, students will participate in various speaking exercises and activities, and students will deliver a variety of speeches chosen from but not limited to the following: introductory, expository, demonstrative, persuasive, interpretive, and special occasion. Students will be expected to participate in class not only as speakers but also as audience members.

     

    Multicultural Literature

    Multicultural Literature explores what comprises culture and why it is important to learn about a variety of cultures. Throughout this one-semester course, students will read non-fiction texts, short stories, and poems that offer diverse cultural perspectives, as well as books chosen from the following list: Sandra Cisneros’s The House on Mango Street, Helena Maria Viramontes’s Under the Feet of Jesus, Yoko Kawashima Watkins’s So Far from the Bamboo Grove, Richard E. Kim’s Lost Names, Richard Wright’s Black Boy, Alice Walker’s The Color Purple, K. Tsianina Lomawaimas Away from Home, and Linda LeGarde Grover’s The Dance Boots. Students will engage in discussions using various strategies designed to develop critical thinking and collaboration skills. Finally, students will complete projects ranging from traditional and semi-traditional writing assignments to presentations using various media.